Council given deadline

PORT Stephens Council has been given a 5pm Wednesday deadline to withdraw a key defence document in its multi-million dollar battle over drainage at a Nelson Bay housing estate after its own barrister conceded in court there was “a question as to whether it remains a live issue”.
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The concession came during a hearing in the NSW Supreme Court on March 17 afterJustice Michael Pembroke noted the council’s reliance on a 2011 document as a defence “appears difficult to maintain”.

In a letter on March 30 Lagoons Estate developer David Vitnell gave the council until 5pm Wednesday to withdraw the document –a 2011 deed of agreement between a previous Lagoons Estate owner and the council in which the previous owner agreed not to take any further legal action against the council over drainage issues.

Mr Vitnell, who launched Supreme Court against the council in November in an attempt to force it to carry out drainage works it was ordered by the NSW Court of Appeal to undertake in 2006, said the deed was not a valid defence for the council to make because he was not involved with the 2011 agreement.

“Your client would appear to have no prospect of success,” he advised the council’s solicitor on March 30.

Not happy: Lagoons Estate residents (from left) Bill Park, George Pagacs, Gloria Grayson, Randall Grayson, Ron Ricketts and Roy Johnson.

Mr Vitnell warned the council he would seek to have the deed of agreement struck out of the council’s defence if the council did not withdraw it by 5pm on Wednesday.

The likely withdrawal of the deed of agreement leaves the council arguing it has complied with the 2006 Court of Appeal orders. This gave the council 18 months to complete drainage works tostop stormwater from nearby Dowling Street and adjoining Seabreeze housing estate from running across Lagoons estate into the lagoon that gave the estate its name.

But the council faces difficulties after three water engineers in relatedNSW Land and Environment Court proceedings in March 2015, including the council’sexpert, said the Court of Appeal decision required drainage works where “therewould be no drainage surface water directly to” the Lagoons Estate, except in an extreme rainfall event.

On March 17 Justice Pembroke directedMr Vitnell and the council to agree on an expert to determine if surface water flows from Dowling Street and the Seabreeze estate to the Lagoons estate, or he would appoint one.

Justice Pembroke told the court he was “a little troubled by the (council’s) attitude in general”, after the council argued against the need for an expert opinion about the surface water before other issues raised by Mr Vitnell and the council were settled.

In a statement of claim lodged against Port Stephens Council in November Mr Vitnell sought a declaration that $1.3 million in drainage works undertaken by the council after the 2006 Court of Appeal decision had failed to stop stormwater containing high levels of nutrients and waste from entering Lagoons estate and ending in the lagoon.

He also sought an order that the council complete required drainage works –costed at between $4 million and more than $30 million –within 12 months of a decision, and a declaration that further on-site works at Lagoons estate were not needed because their purpose was to cope with stormwater from outside the estate.

The cost of works to repair damage from significant stormwater runoff alleged to have entered the estate was more than $120,000, Mr Vitnell said in the statement of claim.

His evidence will include a March report by water hydrologist Drew Bewsher concluding that “very significant surface runoff volumes were being diverted onto Lagoons estate” from Dowling Street outside the estate, and the adjoining Seabreeze estate.

This included significant surface runoff after a January 5 rain event he described as “not particularly heavy rainfall”.

“In my opinion the presence of stormwater runoff entering the Lagoons estate on at least three occasions in the past 12 months indicates the council has not complied with the (2006) court order,” Mr Bewsher wrote.

The council drainage works, thatattempted to collect runoff from roads and footpaths and infiltrate it into the ground without causing surface discharges, would have complied with the court order if it had been successful.

He concluded the design of the drainage works, construction, maintenance, or a combination of the three, meant the works had not succeeded in stopping surface water from entering Lagoons estate.

Port Stephens Council general manager Wayne Wallis and mayor Bruce Mackenzie did not respond to questions last week about Mr Vitnell’s action against the council. The Newcastle Herald has sought responses from the council to the 5pm Wednesday deadline.

Councillor Geoff Dingle, who last week said the Lagoons case had so far cost the council $9 million over years of court proceedings and drainageworks, called on other Port Stephens councillors to ask questions about the council’s handling of the case.

“This is a very serious case. We’ve been provided with little detail where it’s going and the risk ratepayers currently face, and I’m concerned councillors have no idea what’s potentially coming down the line.”

Cr Dingle said estimates in 2006 of the need for many millions of dollars to complete the drainage works were a major concern for the council if it lost the case, and his own experience of the volumes of water that entered the estate left him extremely concerned.

“We’re always told Port Stephens is a rich council. We might be asset rich but if we all of a sudden have to find millions of dollars to complete these works, that’s a very serious problem,” he said.

Lagoons estate residents who have joined Mr Vitnell in the action against the council say the nutrient-rich stormwater entering the lagoon was a serious environmental concern.

Swans draft in Hunter trio

FLYING HIGH: Jess Cassidy, Alison Parkin and Amy Hessell will play for the Sydney Swans women’s academy against the GWS Giants on Saturday. Picture: Marina Neil
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JESS Cassidy first kicked a Sherrin at Grossmann High Schoolfour years ago.

On Saturday, the 21-year-old will line up for the Sydney Swans Academy side against GWS Giants at the Sydney Cricket Ground.

A strong performance there will put the defender in contention for a place inthe inaugural national women’s league.

Cassidy, who plays for the Maitland Saints,and Gosford duo Alison Parkin, 28, and Amy Hessell, 23, have been drafted into the Swans side from the Hunter-Central Coast Academy.

“Jess is a Maitland product and only started playing seniorAFL last year,” Hunter-Central Coast development manager Craig Golledge said.“She is a great example of our Swans Cup schoolgirl competition. I remember when she was captain of Grossman High and helped take them through to the state knockout final. We saw the potential in her then and she has really developed.

“Alison and Amy have been playing in the Sydney competition in recent years for Gosford, who have joined the Black Diamond competition,and are two of the more experienced players involved in the academy.”

The Hunter-Central Coast academy is one of five in NSW along with Sydney, Western Sydney, Canberra and Wagga.

“We have 28 players ranging from age 15 to 31,” Golledge said.

Parkin and Hessell were a part of the Swans side which beat the Giants by five points at Moore Park last month. Newcastle City’s MeaghanMcDonald also played in that match but missed selection for Saturday.

A NSW team will be selected after Saturday’s game whichis a curtain raiser to the AFL blockbuster between the same teams.That team will take on South Australia later in the season.A 10-team national women’s league kicks off next year.

“State representatives will certainly be of interest to the teams competing in the national league,” Golledge said.

Golledge said he had been blown away at the skill level of the women in the first match between the Swans and Giants.

“To go to the next level was a bit of a shock for some of our girls, not only for the women’s team, but the girls involved in the youth game,” he said. “They realise they have a lot to learn and a lot more development to get up tothe level of the Sydney, Canberra and Wagga girls.”

Meanwhile,Greater Western Sydney captain Callan Ward says his team are grown men who should no longer be slapped the tag of the Swans’ “little brother”.

The derby count is a lopsided 7-1 in favour of the Swans but the gap between the two clubs is narrowing.

Their days of using inexperience as an excuse are also numbered. The team the Giants fielded against Geelong last week had played a total ofonly 31 fewer games than the Swans round two side.

“We’re all grown men now, our average age isn’t too much lessthan what they are,” Ward said.”Everyone talks about big brother, little brother it’s not reallythat anymore,we’re out there to play games.We’refully grown men now, we’re really happy just to take the Swans on now and play like grown men.”

The Giants have been dealt ablow with promising young defender Caleb Marchbank ruled out for six to eight weeks with an anklesyndesmosis injury.

Cheers to  historic Rutherford Hotel revamp| PHOTOS

RENOVATION RUMBLE: Rutherford Hotel’s new owner Stephen Hunt has big plans for the highway landmark. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers.It is a western suburbs landmark, few realising its historical significance and its former name The Union Inn.
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Rutherford Hotel is a huge part of Maitland’s history, a watering hole with a colourful past and a business about to undergoa massive facelift.

The hotel and adjoining land has recently been purchased for an undisclosed sum by SJH Hospitality, the same owners of The Kent and CBD hotels inNewcastle.

SJH Hospitality CEO Stephen Hunt has big plans for the iconic highway pub and wants to retain its heritage.

In a bid to find out more about the hotel’s past Mr Hunt contacted Maitland Historical Society.

The hotel was built as an inn in 1851 known asThe Union Inn and was renamedRutherford Hotel when publican Miles Kelly took it over in 1875.

The Maitland Mercury reported in 1909 that “important additions and alterations” werebeing made to the hotel consisting of the construction of an upper storey and the remodelling and complete renovation of the original building.

The work was carried out by W Taylor and Sons to plans and specifications prepared by architect James Warren Scobie.

The additions of brick, the walls plastered, with pine ceilings and new rooms were constructed in accordance with the Liquor Act along with a balcony along the front supported on cast iron columns with “handsome brackets and frieze”, The Mercury report said.

Mr Hunt, who lives in the Maitland area, said the latest round of renovations will include an internal refit and rebranding.

He declined to reveal how much was being spent on the project but said the overall plan would be three to fouryears in the making.

“Rutherford Hotel has great potential and thispart of town is such a huge growth area,” Mr Hunt said.

“Each armof the hotel’s business will be getting a bit of love,” he said.

“The bottle shop will be revamped and rebranded with new signs and logos, there will be new uniforms for the staff and we will be spicing up the menu a little,” Mr Hunt said.

“The building will have a complete repaint but we don’t want to modernise it too much, we just want to pay homage to its historical significance so heritage colours will be used where possible.”

The pub’s gaming room will be relocated with a focus on more interior function space.

Improvements will start as soon as the changes are officially rubber stamped by the Office of Liquor, Gaming and Racing.

Rugby league great and St George Dragons life memberEddie Lumsden is a former Rutherford Hotelpublican andstill visits the hotel. Hewore 15 Test caps for Australia from1959 to1963.

PEEK back through the archives at how the region’s pubs and patronshave transformed.

Cheers to  historic Rutherford Hotel revamp| PHOTOS Largs Hotel 1993 pub wins award Around the table at Largs Hotel Ron Lawler (drinking) 44years, Peter Robinson 10 years, Basil Andrews 30 years, Tom Salter 30 years, and Doug Cook 25 years toast the pubs success taken by Waide Maguire 6-7-1993

Bellbird Hotel Cessnock. Publican David George (right). Date 10th May 1984.

Kent Hotel 1991 Public Bar Kent Hotel Hamilton Photo by Dean Osland 6-6-1991

Harry Jackson of Maryville looks over the match striking plates in the Kent Hotel Hamilton Photo by Waide Maguire 16-8-1990

Cambridge Hotel. Bill Anderson from Hobart and Leila Hendler from Merewether.Date 8th March 1988.

Interior of the Imperial Hotel, Maitland, in July 1987. Picture by John Herrett

Iron Horse 1991 Iron Horse Inn Cardiff

Iron Horse 1991 Iron Horse Inn Cardiff HUNTER PUB LIFE photo by John Herrett 5-6-1991

Kent Hotel 1991 Kent Hotel Hamilton Bistro – bar area Photo by Dean Osland 6-6-1991

Kent Hotel 1990 Const Dale Gollan and Pauline Stirling part owner of the Kent

Lass O’Gowrie Hotel 1991 Wickham HUNTER PUB LIFE Photo by John Herrett 4-6-1991

Kent Hotel 1993 Lyn M’Crohan and bar manager Frank Sottovia and a regular Photo by Ken Robson 12-1-1993

Largs Hotel 1994 AHA Award for excellence “Outstanding Community Service & achievment John Galea and Vicki Galea owners photo by Eddie Cross 1-12-1994

Lass O’Gowrie Hotel 1982 PHOTO BY gEORGE sTEELE used NH 4-1-1982

Kent Hotel 1990

1992 Renovated hotel Hunter on Hunter photo by Darren Pateman 27-8-1992

Junction Tavern 1991 Junction Tavern Main Bar Photo by Anita Jones

Peta Longue, Benjamin Gilmour and Alex Blanning. Leopard Lounge. Date 18th february 1999.

Cambridge Hotel. Peta Longue, Benjamin Gilmour and Alex Blanning. Leopard Lounge. Date 18th february 1999.

The Brewery Queens Wharf. Date 15th March 1990.

Bushwacker Hotel. Date 28th November 1975.

Clarendon Hotel. Licence 100 years. Graham Peate from Merewether been drinking there since he was 18 and Miss Vi Lane licencee dressed in gown 100 y.o.. Date 30th October 1991. Copy Photo by PHIL HEARNE

The Brewery Queens Wharf. Dave Williams.Date 25th February 1988.

Bunnan Hotel. Stan Scaysbrook, Sexy the duck and Margaret Scaysbrook. Looking on Albert Bramley.Date 26th February 1986.

Clarendon Hotel rear. Date 26th April 1984.

The Brewery Queens Wharf. .Date 18th November 1988.

Blackbutt Hotel. Dining area. Date 6th December 1978.

Bunnan Hotel. Margaret Scaysbrook followed by Sexy the duck. Date 26th February 1986.

Bunnan Hotel. Margaret Scaysbrook. Date 26th February 1986. Copy Photo by PHIL HEARNE

The Brewery Queens Wharf. Date 18th November 1988.

The Brewery Queens Wharf. Date 9th December 1991.

Clarendon Hotel. Date 28th March 1991.

Clarendon Hotel. Licence 100 yers. Miss Vi Lane licencee lighting the candles. Date 30th October 1991.

Bunk House, Stan Scaysbrook. Date 26th February 1986.

Blackbutt Hotel. Date 18th May 1986.

The Brewery Queens Wharf. Date 9th December 1991.

Cambridge Hotel. Manager Steve Northey.Date 7th May 1998.

Albion Hotel Wickham.

Caves Beach Hotel. 12th December 1997.

Caves Beach Hotel. Eatery Date 12th December 1997.

Gunyah Hotel. Kiel Emerton and Terry Brain partners at Gunyah Hotel. Date 20th March 1998.

Caves Beach Hotel. Restaurant Date 18th January 2000.

Caves Beach Hotel. 12th December 1997.

David Gazzoli and Ron Lindsay. Date 12th November 1999.

Caves Beach Hotel. 12th December 1997.

Beach Hotel Merewether. Jocelyn Bell serves a sub zero. Pic by Ron Bell. 27th December 1995.

Clarendon Hotel. David Gazzoli and Ron Lindsay. Date 12th November 1999.

Clarendon Hotel. Ron Lindsay. Date 23rd Feruary 2000.

Beach Hotel Merewether. Jocelyn Bell serves a sub zero. Pic by Ron Bell. 27th December 1995.

Caves Beach Hotel. Eatery Date 8th May 1998.

Albion Hotel Wickham. Patricia and David Sylvester have recently sold the hotel. 18th April 2000.

Beach Hotel Merewether. ‘Miss Lovely Legs’. Date 25th December 1999.

Caves Beach Hotel. Glen Herivel and Lee McWilliams.12th December 1997.

Caves Beach Hotel. 12th December 1997.

Cessnock Hotel. Terry Petersen Assistant Manager. Date 16th March 1998.

Beach Hotel Merewether. Extensions to the Beaches Hotel Merewether. John Twohill Owner/Lic. Photo by Dean Osland. Date 1964.

Albion Hotel Wickham. Nicole Ryan and Nicole Egan. Date 28th April 1986. Photo by Quentin Jones.

Bushwacker Hotel. Max Stead. Date 28th November 1975.

Albion Hotel Wickham. Date 3rd May 1986. Copy Photo by PHIL HEARNE

Cessnock Hotel. Date 10th February 1999.

Cambridge Hotel. Lorelle Baker (niece), Joseph Baker (Proprietor) and Debbie Baker (daughter). Date 5th December 1988.

Albion Hotel Wickham. Date 10th May 1990.

Albion Hotel Wickham. Dining room interior. Date 10th May 1990.

Albion Hotel Wickham. Fay the Barmaid. Date 28th April 1986.

Beach Hotel Merewether. Outside Beach hotel. Pic by George Steele Date 9th January 1983.

Albion Hotel Wickham. Date 3rd May 1986.

The Brewery Queens Wharf. Linda Masters from Merewether, Ian Smith from Elemore Vale and Bar person Roslyn Boyle.

The Brewery Queens Wharf. Date 18th November 1988.

The Brewery Queens Wharf. Date 18th November 1988.

Albion Hotel Wickham. Picketers at Albion Hotel.Date 6th May 1986.

Bayside Tavern Wine Fair. Maree and John McRedmond, James Roddy. Date 10th November 1994.

Belmont Hotel. Date 29th July 1993.

Beach Hotel Merewether. Outside Beach hotel. Pic by George Steele date 9th January 1983.

Agriculture Hotel Singleton. Allan and Sue Watham toast to the success of the hotel dining room. Photo by PETER STOOP. Date 23rd November 1992.

Bellbird Hotel Cessnock. Mathew and Stacey Ryan. Date 20th July 1989.

The Brewery Queens Wharf. Partners Russell Elkin and John Byrnes. Date 26th November 1990.

Albion Hotel Wickham. Gerry Wells with his dolls in footy colours. photo Wicks. Date 10th May 1991.

Bel-Air Hotel Kotara. Drinkers in front bar – Punters bar. Steve Donehue from Adamstown Heights, Greg Felthan from Adamstown Heights, Norm Hopkins from Kotara, Frank Nicholson from Adamstown Heights and barmaid Trish from Bar Beach. Photo by A. Maclean. Date 2nd April 1987.

Bunnan Hotel. Albert Bramley and Stan Scaysbrook. Date 26th February 1986.

Blackbutt Hotel. Kel Davis, Ron Eastick and Gary O’Brien

Bel-Air Hotel Kotara. Sign behind bar. Photo by Steve Tickner. Date 3rd April 1987.

Caves Beach Hotel. Brian Sanotti (right) and Chef Gordon Soo. Date 20th January 1993.

Albion Hotel Wickham. Dolls in footy colors.

Adamstown Hotel. Dick Robinson from Adamstown and Brian Brunner from Hamilton South. Photo by Andrew Maclean. Date 21st July 1987.

Bayside Tavern. Date November 1994.

Bayside Tavern Wine Fair. Judy Hall (right) helping customers Noel Huxley and Terry McGuiness. Date 9th November 1994.

Bayside Tavern Wine Fair. Maree and John McRedmond, James Roody. 10th November 1994.

Grand Hotel Newcastle 1990 Pluto’s night spot New space ship for D J Grand Hotel Newcastle HUNTER PUB LIFE photo by Darren Pateman 19-10-1990

Cricketers Arms Cooks Hill 1983 photo by David Johns 18-3-1983 Police outside the Cricketers Arms Hotel Cooks Hill after complaints from residents about people on footpath

HUNTER HOTELS ARCHIVAL REVIVAL Gunyah Hotel Belmont 1973 used NMH Lake Herald 25-1-1973 Part of the lounge section of the Gunyah Hotel, pictured during lunch hour rush, where patrons can pursue culinary delights on offer amid a strong atmosphere of colonial style furniture and a large mural of an old lake Macquarie scene.

Gunyah Hotel Belmont 1973 used NMH Lake Herald 25-1-1973 A scene of the Hotels terrace from the public bar windows. The terrace is a place of fresh air and shade where family groups can enjoy the cool bonhomie as well as a fine view of the lake.

Duke of Wellington 1983 photo by George Steele 4-8-1983

Grand Hotel Newcastle 1985 Restauran in Grand Hotel Newcastle Helen Connell Co-ordinator Ron Simpson Speacialist cook Jane Lander Cook for restaurant guide photo by Stuart Davidson 21-6-1985

Cricketers Arms Cooks Hill 1982 Hundreds stand on footpath photo by Quentin Jones 10-12-1982

Crown & Anchor 1990 HUNTER PUB LIFE photo by David Wicks 5-6-1990

Denman Hotel Abermain 1991 Hotelier Ralph Collins photo by Eddie Cross 7-3-1991

Gunyah Hotel Belmont 1992 a good view and relaxed atmoshere photo by Darren Pateman 4-12-1992

Commercial Hotel Boolaroo 1991 6-12-1991 Agnes Hales and Maxine Wood photo by Darren Pateman

1988 Cocktail mixing competition 17-5-1988

General Roberts New Lambton 1992 Fiona and Sue at the new Goldrush room november 1992

General Roberts New Lambton 1991 Tanya Linquist and Jan Wilkes Photo by Darren Pateman 8-3-1991

Gates Hotel Adamstown 1987 Gates Hotel Adamstown photo taken 10-10-1995

General Roberts New Lambton 1991 Bob Wilkes in the new bar Photo by Darren Pateman 8-3-1991

Gunyah Hotel Belmont 1992 Sharyn Foley serving Tracy Lynn a drink 4-12-1992

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Beth soars at Bluebird

MAKING HAY: Beth Brown performing on reality TV show, American Pickers, in Nashville last November.TO play Nashville’s Bluebird Cafe you need to possess some serious songwritingchops.
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Global pop sensation Taylor Swift was discovered there, country megastar Garth Brooks honed his craft on its stage and Blacksmiths’ Beth Brown hopes her performances at the Bluebirdleadto her careerbreakthrough.

TAKING A CHANCE: The career of Blacksmiths singer-songwriter Beth Brown is bearing fruit following her move to Nashville 10 months ago.

For the past 10 months the indie-pop songstress has been based in Tennessee’smusic mecca plying her trade and developing her songwritingwith some of America’s best.

Last week Brown released her cinematic trackDream Coat on SoundCloudfrom her debut EP of the same name, due out later this year.

After spending several years in Melbourne fronting blues rock band, BB and the Holy Rollers, Brown said playing at the Bluebird and Americana Fest had expanded her creativity.

Beth Brown – Angels and Beasts (Live)“I’ve learnt so much,” Brown said from Nashville. “Before coming to Nashville I’d never co-wrote before. It gives you the advantage of seeing how other wonderful people put together a song.

“I think the gap is bridging for people who want to make music in the US. People see your passion and talent and I’ve been surprised how welcoming they are.”

In Nashville she has co-writtenwith respectedsongsmithsJohn Hadley, Shannon Sanders and Jerry Salley, who have previously worked withJohn Legend, Chris Stapleton, Patti Griffin and Emmylou Harris.

Rocking up in a foreign country expecting to book gigs sounds like a daunting step, but Brown said it was quite the opposite.

“Americans love Australians and I found there were opportunities to play from the very beginning,” she said. “Although it’sthe most competitive music industry in the world, the locals will generally give you a shot to prove yourability.”

BORKING UPBUDDING promoter Brock Perrington hopes Saturday’s inaugural BorkFest can become an annual part of Newcastle’s calendar to give metal fans of all ages amusical outlet.

The Small Ballroom will host the mini-festival, which will be headlined by Newcastle metal band Trophy Eyes and features another 11 acts. Originally BorkFest was scheduled for the Newcastle Tennis Club, before it was shifted to minimise security costs.

Perrington hatched the idea six months ago following the demise of Hunter Street’sHombre Records. The all-age venuewas quickly replaced by Drone, who hosted the BorkFest’s battle of the bands in recent weeks to earn a slot of the festival bill.

“Now that we’ve got Drone, I thought what else can we do,” Perrington said. “I had BorkFest starting, so I thought let’s kept it going.”

FUNDING SUCCESSFRIENDSof the late Simon “JimmyNolan” Lambert of Newcastle are ecstatic that they have reached their goal of $8500 in three weeks to fund the mastering of an album of Lambert’s songs. The gofundme campaign topped $8500 this week. Every extra $650 raised will go towards adding another Lambert song to the album.

Friends and acquaintances involved in the project will perform the songs on the album live at a Newcastle venue in August. Lambert died after he fell sleepwalking in March 2009.

ROCKINGROOMTHE premise is simple. Provide the stage, sound production, lighting and house band then import a impersonator and you have amobile music show known as the Rock Room.

A group of Newcastle musicians, known as Mighty Rock,began the Rock Room last Augustplaying gigs around the Belmont area. On April 17 they hosttheir 10thgig, a Cold Chisel show at Belmont Bowling Club, featuring Jimmy Barnes impersonator Carter Roser.Other Rock Room performances have includedRod Stewart and Midnight Oil tributeacts.

MONSTER FREEMAITLAND’S Groovin The Moo maybe sold out, but unfortunately there will be no Of Monsters and Men.

The Icelandic folk band, who are famous for their huge hit Little Talks, were added to the Bunbury leg of GTM only this week. It followed the cancellation of US acts Mutemath and Vic Mensa last week.

BELLO IT OUTAMERICAN bluegrass hero Willie Watson will headline the secondBello Winter Music Festival in Bellingen from July 7 to 10.

Joining the OldCrow Medicine Show founder will beJeff Lang, Kylie Auldist, Tijuana Cartel, Mojo Juju, L-Fresh The Lion, Jaaleekaay, Bullhorn, Jazz Party, Allensworth, Inga Liljeström and King Tide.

Willie Watson – Mexican CowboyA LITTLE SUPPORTCOUNTRY folk duo Little Georgia will support Americansinger-songwriter Ryan Bingham at his Lizotte’s show on April 24.Ashleigh MannixandJustin Carter have toured relentlessly since launching debut albumBootleglast year.

Programmed to party

RAGE WITH THE MACHINE: Party boys The Bennies will bring their madcap antics and rocking riffs to the Cambridge Hotel on Thursday.YOU will never hear The Bennies get political, play emotional ballads or attempt electronic R&B.
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The Melbourne punk-skarockers are a party band –pure and simple. Andtheir appeal is becoming increasingly infectious as evidenced by their third recordWisdom Machinedebuting at No.40 this week on the ARIA charts. On Thursday their rock’n’roll shenanigansreturn to the Cambridge Hotel.

With songs likeLegalise (But Don’t Tax),Detroit Rock CiggiesandParty Til I Die (Or Die Trying), The Bennies, like The Darkness before them, enjoy peddling in irony.

The Bennies – Party Machine (language warning)“Lots of people take themselves pretty seriously,”The Bennies vocalist Anty Horgan said.“A lot of people do great really emotional music, but we’re just trying to create a positive thing. I suppose the irony is something we’re aiming for.”

The irony was laid on thick forParty Til I Die (Or Die Trying), easily the craziest song on Wisdom Party with lyrics about getting covered in blood and spit from partying too hard.

“That song is supposed to be a pretty over-the-top joke song,” Horgan said.“Every line itwas like, ‘Can we write this, can we get away with this? This is pretty ridiculous, is it too much’? We just kept going with it and wanted to try and create a B52s kind of sound as well.

“It’s good when we’re practicing and writing and we all start laughing at a certain bit. That’s when we know we’re on to something good. There’s a time and place for everything and some songs don’t have that, but for the most part we joke around a lot, so it’s more honest to have that in the songs.”

FAR OUT: The Wisdom Machine album cover designed by Geoffrey Horgan, the father of Bennies frontman Anty.

The Bennies don’t fit into the currentindie scene. There’s no hint of electronica.The four-piece also take a retro approach to album covers. Horgan’s fatherGeoffreydesigned Wisdom Machine’s psychedelic artwork, in partnership withSmith Street Band drummer Chris Cowburn.

“Holding a physical piece of vinyl is such a work of art and when it’s done well by a band it can be something really special,” Horgan said.“Many people don’t buy physical music so we want to reward those people that do by giving them something they can hold in their hands and say ‘This is sweet’.”

168 million drink containers are littered in NSW every year

The beverage industry has “finally acknowledged” that four per cent of all beverage containers in NSW are littered, green groups say.
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The admission came when representatives from Coca-Cola Amatil, the Australian Food and Grocery Council and the Australian Beverages Council appeared at the final public hearing of the Senate inquiry into marine plastics.

“Ninety-six per cent of beverage containers are already collected through existing systems. As industry, we want to help the Government design a solution that focuses on capturing that last 4 per cent,” said Coca-Cola Amatil in itswritten submission to the inquiry.

The public hearing in Canberra last week was the fourth held around the country, addressing the threat of marine plastic pollution in Australia and its waters.

“At a rate of fourper cent, the amount of bottles and cans proliferating in the NSW environment is over 168 million per annum, [that’s] 17,700 tonnes,” saidDave West, national policy director of the Boomerang Alliance,which represents more than 30 environmental groups.

Clean Up Australia Day volunteers battle the bottle scourge in Sydney’s waterways in March this year. Photo: Peter Rae

“Governments are moving towards banning plastic bags, which account for a quarter of this rate in litter. All takeaway food containers and cups represent just 53 per cent of the amount of litter the beverage industry is responsible for.”

Mr West said, while “four per cent” is the figure used by the government,the number of beverage containers littered across the state could in fact be much higher.

The “four per cent” estimate is based on the assumption that about 70 per cent of all beverages are consumed at home, which equates to around 20.2 containers per household, per week, according to the NSW Environment Protection Authority.

That assumption also suggests those containers are disposed of or recycled at home, however this is not always the case.

A study commissioned by the EPA last year found only 12.6containers a week end up in each household’s bin.

“This means government and industry have lost some 1.1 billion (112,000 tonnes) beverage containers a year, in NSW. It also means they have been consistently overestimating the recycling rate,” Mr West said.

“The amount of beverage litter is appalling if you consider that that’s what’s left after government, industry, councils and NGOs in NSW spend over $162 million per annumto capture just 56,000 tonnes a year.”

The NSW government has committed to implementing a container deposit scheme by July next year, with a decision onthe model of such a schemeexpected in coming months.

Cans and bottles strewn about the grandstand at Monash Park at Gladesville on Sunday. Photo: Lynda Ross

The final contenders in the government’s decision-making process were a community-supported container deposit scheme and an alternative beverage industry-backed option known as Thirst for Good.

“Reducing the volume of litter by 40 per cent by 2020 is one of 12 Premier’s Priorities for this term of government, and whatever CDS model is chosen by government will need to make a major contribution to achieving this target,” said NSW Environment Minister Mark Speakman.

Domestic and international recycling companies have estimated there would be an investment of up to $160 million in a world’s best practice container deposit scheme.

Companies such as Remondis, Envirobank Recycling, TOMRA and Revive Recycling have pitched their support for a scheme that includes 600-800 automated redemption points, automated and manual depots in lower population areas and hubs to service the commercial and industrial sector.

“A CDS in NSW using world’s best practice will reclaim around 1 billion containers every year…and will upgrade the recycling of a further 2 billion or so. Together this is conservatively estimated to be worth around $35 million annually,”said Markus Fraval, CEO of Revive Recycling.

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168 million drink containers are littered in NSW every year

Cans and bottles strewn about the grandstand at Monash Park at Gladesville on Sunday. Photo: Lynda Ross Cans and bottles strewn about Monash Park at Gladesville on Sunday. Photo: Lynda Ross
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“The amount of beverage litter is appalling:” Dave West, national policy director of the Boomerang Alliance.

Clean Up Australia Day volunteers battle the bottle scourge in Sydney’s waterways in March this year. Photo: Peter Rae

 

The beverage industry has “finally acknowledged” that four per cent of all beverage containers in NSW are littered, green groups say.

The admission came when representatives from Coca-Cola Amatil, the Australian Food and Grocery Council and the Australian Beverages Council appeared at the final public hearing of the Senate inquiry into marine plastics.

“Ninety-six per cent of beverage containers are already collected through existing systems. As industry, we want to help the Government design a solution that focuses on capturing that last 4 per cent,” said Coca-Cola Amatil in its written submission to the inquiry.

The public hearing in Canberra last week was the fourth held around the country, addressing the threat of marine plastic pollution in Australia and its waters.

At 44 per cent, drink containers make up the largest proportion of litter volume in NSW, according to the National Litter Index, an annual survey of litter in the environment.

“At a rate of four per cent, the amount of bottles and cans proliferating in the NSW environment is over 168 million per annum, [that’s] 17,700 tonnes,” said Dave West, national policy director of the Boomerang Alliance, which represents more than 30 environmental groups.

“Governments are moving towards banning plastic bags, which account for a quarter of this rate in litter. All takeaway food containers and cups represent just 53 per cent of the amount of litter the beverage industry is responsible for.”

Mr West said, while “four per cent” is the figure used by the government, the number of beverage containers littered across the state could in fact be much higher.

The “four per cent” estimate is based on the assumption that about 70 per cent of all beverages are consumed at home, which equates to around 20.2 containers per household, per week, according to the NSW Environment Protection Authority.

That assumption also suggests those containers are disposed of or recycled at home, however this is not always the case.A study commissioned by the EPA last year found only 12.6 containers a week end up in each household’s bin.

“This means government and industry have lost some 1.1 billion (112,000 tonnes) beverage containers a year, in NSW. It also means they have been consistently overestimating the recycling rate,” Mr West said.

“The amount of beverage litter is appalling if you consider that that’s what’s left after government, industry, councils and NGOs in NSW spend over $162 million per annum to capture just 56,000 tonnes a year.”

The NSW government has committed to implementing a container deposit scheme by July next year, with a decision on the model of such a scheme expected in coming months.

The final contenders in the government’s decision-making process were a community-supported container deposit scheme and an alternative beverage industry-backed option known as Thirst for Good.

“Reducing the volume of litter by 40 per cent by 2020 is one of 12 Premier’s Priorities for this term of government, and whatever CDS model is chosen by government will need to make a major contribution to achieving this target,” said NSW Environment Minister Mark Speakman.

Domestic and international recycling companies have estimated there would be an investment of up to $160 million in a world’s best practice container deposit scheme.

Companies such as Remondis, Envirobank Recycling, TOMRA and Revive Recycling have pitched their support for a scheme that includes 600-800 automated redemption points, automated and manual depots in lower population areas and hubs to service the commercial and industrial sector.

“A CDS in NSW using world’s best practice will reclaim around 1 billion containers every year…and will upgrade the recycling of a further 2 billion or so. Together this is conservatively estimated to be worth around $35 million annually,” said Markus Fraval, CEO of Revive Recycling.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Can you become a wine expert in 24 hours?

A new handbook promises to make you a wine expert in just a day. A new handbook promises to make you a wine expert in just a day.
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10 things you must know about wineLearning the lingo

A new handbook promises to make you a wine expert in just 24 hours. Andrew P. Street takes the challenge.

Like so many South Australians who eked out an existence living in share houses after finishing uni, my initial appreciation of wine began with the discovery that Barossa Valley cleanskins were wonderfully cheap – and thus was a lifelong love affair born.

Since then my knowledge of wine has expanded mainly through the tried-and-true method of drinking it. From this, in the words of management training seminars, I acquired four key learnings:

1. Wine is great and, yes, I’d love another glass, thanks.

2. Cellaring is for rich people, and don’t even pretend you know what you’re doing. (As my friend David Hewitt memorably advised as I showed him my “cellar”, cunningly disguised as “a cupboard in the laundry”: “Wine is meant to be drunk, as indeed are we.”)

3. A youth exposed to rich, peppery McLaren Vale shiraz means that shiraz from all other districts tastes like water.

4. Sure, why not open a second bottle?

And while these are sound rules of thumb to help guide one through the rough and tumble of life, they are perhaps not the most comprehensive of systems with which to navigate the vagaries of wine consumption.

Thus, it was with no small amount of enthusiasm that I read the new handbook by British wine expert and critic Jancis Robinson, The 24-Hour Wine Expert: a slender and informative book which I assume has now effectively transformed me into a freelance sommelier.

The title of her marvellously easy-to-read book refers to the length of time that it should take for you to absorb and retain the information, it should be pointed out, and not necessarily on how to drink wine for 24 hours.

That means there’s nothing in the bit on food matching about what breakfast wine goes best with Coco Pops, for example. Although having read the book, I’m going to suggest a full-bodied port: it will complement the chocolate tones of the meal while also being sweet enough not to taste bitter when matched with all that added sugar.

The advice in the book is generally great for readers who like wine, would like to know more about it without getting bogged down in jargon, and are keen to be able to do more than nod blankly and say “ah, of course, Cote Rotie is… nice?” when discussing the great wine regions.

There’s information on buying wine in restaurants (key tip: sommeliers love talking about the wine list, ask for their advice), what bits of wine tasting are significant (like colour, which is an indication of age) and which are pure theatre (such as pondering the “legs” of wine that dribble down the sides of a swished glass, which means nothing), and why waiters do that thing where they pour a bit of wine and let you taste it (hint: it’s not to check you like it).

Gratifyingly, Robinson’s advice with regards to cellaring neatly matches the aforementioned claim by my dear, drunken friend David.

She points out that most wines are made to be drunk within a year or three of being bought, that people cellar their fancy wines far, far longer than is good for the wine because they worry there’s not an event special enough to be worth cracking an expensive bottle, and finally that if you’re the sort of person flush enough to be buying bottles to lay down then you can probably afford the sort of engineering required to create a good environment for bottles filled with continually evolving biological reactions. Spoiler: laundry cupboards aren’t as perfect a wine cellar as you might naturally assume.

However, it’s one thing to do reading comprehension, it’s quite another to put one’s newfound knowledge to the test. And that’s why I phoned wine expert Mike Bennie, fresh from a day literally spent stomping grapes in Tasmania, to quiz me on my hard-earned new wisdom.

As an expert of no small renown, what’s his assessment of The 24-Hour Wine Expert?

“It’s really good,” he says. “It’s easy to read, good content, up-to-date, in plain language, giving the bare bones of learning about wine quickly – I think Jancis is going to sell a billion of them.”

Of course, the proof is in the testing so… go:

“OK… what are the most common grape varieties in France?”

Right. Well, it’ll be the best-known ones with the Frenching-est names, presumably: cabernet sauvignon, merlot, grenache, sauvignon blanc…?

“Correct! OK, what are some key wine regions in France?”

Um… Champagne? Cote Rotie is… nice?

“Yep, OK. Hmmm. How about telling me what orange wine is?”

…um, wine that doesn’t rhyme with anything? Yeah, no idea.

“It’s white wine where the skins are left in the juice to give further texture and colour.”

Dammit. Could it possibly be I’m not an expert after all?

“It’s OK, don’t panic. Moving on: what’s the difference between red and white wine?”

Ah, this I know: it’s all down to leaving the skins in during the fermentation, right?

“That’s one hundred per cent correct: each grape has clear juice, effectively – the red’s only red because red skins are left in the juice to colour it. Now, give me your approach to food and wine matching, having read the book?”

It’s mainly down to personal taste rather than some sort of science, you just want something that’s not going to overpower or clash terribly with what you’re eating, wine is nice?

“That’s an elaborate and good response. What does full bodied mean?”

Solid alcohol content? Not having any one flavour overpower the others?

“Yeah, full of flavour, solid content. Not bad! Now you have a little bit more of the world of wine in your brain.”

And there you have it: in the words of no less an authority than Mike Bennie, I am “not bad” and have wine in my brain. High praise indeed!

Verdict: Thanks to The 24-Hour Wine Expert I think we can all agree that I’m basically now a booze genius, ready to hand out my expert advice on the wining arts to everyone within earshot.

And sure, why not open a second bottle?

Wine guru Jancis Robinson. Jancis Robinson’s 10 things you must know about wine

It’s fair to say British critic Jancis Robinson knows a thing or two about wine. As well writing a weekly wine column for The Financial Times she edits The Oxford Companion To Wine, and has co-authored The World Atlas of Wine and WineGrapes: A complete guide to 1,368 vine varieties. In 2003 she received an OBE from the Queen, whose cellar she now advises on. Her most recent book, The 24-Hour Wine Expert, aims to demystify a topic that attracts more than its fair share of pompous, quasi-experts. In that spirit, Good Food asked Robinson for her list of 10 things you simply must know about wine.

1. Establish a relationship with a local retailer. You know how you go into a bookshop and say, “I liked this book,” and the job of the bookseller is to say, “Well, if you liked that I think you’d like this”. There are very strong parallels between booksellers and good wine retailers. Find an independent retailer, tell them what you’ve liked and ask them to suggest something else.

2. This is not going to make me any friends with those who design and sell wine glasses but you really only need one wine glass shape or size. It will do for reds, for whites, for fortifieds and for sparkling. [It should go] in towards the top so you can swirl the wine around and release the all-important aroma without losing it.

3. Never fill a glass more than half full, so that you can swirl it around without losing the wine. Swirling is important because it releases the aroma. And the aroma is really important because at least half, probably two-thirds of the flavour is in the aroma, rather than what you actually put in your mouth.

4. There are no rights or wrongs in wine appreciation;you can’t be wrong if you just say what you think. Because what you think is the most important thing. Don’t be cowed by your friend who says there are wine experts and I’ve got to agree with them. That’s a waste of time. Just follow your own nose and your own likes and dislikes.

5. There is no direct relationship between price and quality in wine. There are a lot of overpriced wines and there are some underpriced wines, which is rather nice. There are a lot of wines where you’re paying over the odds because there’s a marketing person saying, “we need to segment our offering” and “we need an icon wine”, and all that kind of rubbish. A lot of expensive wines are often over-oaked or too alcoholic or exaggerated. The 24-Hour Wine Expert by Jancis Robinson. Penguin Random House copyright.” src=”http://梧桐夜网smh南京夜网419论坛/content/dam/images/g/n/x/n/c/r/image.imgtype.articleLeadwide.620×349.png/1459734500908.png” title=”” width=”100%” />

Illustrations from The 24-Hour Wine Expert by Jancis Robinson. Penguin Random House copyright.

6. Serving temperature is really important. It may seem a bit precious but if you serve a white wine too cold it won’t smell of anything. But if you serve a red wine too warm then it all tastes kind of soupy and muddy and not very refreshing. The ideal serving temperature of a white and red is surprisingly close: probably around 15 or 16 degrees for more or less everything.

7. When you’re matching food and wine the colour isn’t as nearly as important as the weight of the wine. So, if you’re eating something that is really rich and complicated, serve it with a full-bodied wine and if it’s a very pure, light, fresh kind of dish, like poached fish, then serve it with a light wine…one that is 12 per cent alcohol or less.

8. For inexpensive white and rosé wines, be sure to drink the youngest vintage available. They are made to be drunk young, they’re not meant to be aged and, in fact, they lose their fruity freshness with time.

9. If you’re choosing wine in a bottle shop, avoid bottles that have been stored too close to strong light. You certainly don’t want anything that’s been in the window and you wouldn’t want something that been high up on the shelf underneath a strip light. Because light isn’t very good for wine, it tends to age it too fast.

10. It’s not a sign of weakness to ask for help. In restaurants people are often reluctant to ask for advice, tending to think that it’s a battle between them and the restaurant as to who will win. But, in fact, it’s an almost infallible rule that the more you know about wine the more likely it is you’ll say to the waitstaff, “can you advise me?” I’ve been writing about wine for 40 years, I don’t know everything about every single bottle.

Peter Barrett

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Goannas defence put under scrutiny in trialPHOTOS

HITTING THE LINE: Cessnock’s Brendan Hlad attracts three Pickers defenders during Saturday’s 36-all draw at Maitland Sportsground. Photo: MARINA NEILSmailes said the defensive effort at times was disgraceful as the Pickers carved their way through the centre of the field to scored tries from kick offs and their opening two sets.
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“I think it was a scoreline like an under 20s game that’s the first 36-all draw I’ve ever been involved in,” he said.

“It was poor to be honest with you. Our attack was good in patches but the defensive misses were disgraceful really.

“They scored two tries off their first two sets and they ran through us off kick offs twice and made 60 metres that sums up our defence today.

“They did some good stuff with the footy, don’t get me wrong for a second, but you can’t do it off the back of defence like that.

“It’s too tiring and too mentally draining.”

The powerful pairing of centre Shaun Metcalf and Marvin Filipoon the right caused plenty of headaches for the Pickers, even when they didn’t have the ball.

The Pickers stacked their defence to counter the strong running duo and halfback Liam Foran took advantage on three occasions taking on the line and spreading the ball to the open side where the Goannas had extra numbers and scored tries.

Pickers coach Trevor Ott said conceding 36 points was not going to stack up once the season starts.

But Ott did have the benefit of a 44-0 win in reserve grade and the knowledge his defensive combinations are only going to strengthen with more time on the field together.

Goannas defence put under scrutiny in trial | PHOTOS Action from Saturday’s clash between Maitland Pickers and Cessnock Goannas. Photos: MARINAL NEIL

Action from Saturday’s clash between Maitland Pickers and Cessnock Goannas. Photos: MARINAL NEIL

Action from Saturday’s clash between Maitland Pickers and Cessnock Goannas. Photos: MARINAL NEIL

Action from Saturday’s clash between Maitland Pickers and Cessnock Goannas. Photos: MARINAL NEIL

Action from Saturday’s clash between Maitland Pickers and Cessnock Goannas. Photos: MARINAL NEIL

Action from Saturday’s clash between Maitland Pickers and Cessnock Goannas. Photos: MARINAL NEIL

Action from Saturday’s clash between Maitland Pickers and Cessnock Goannas. Photos: MARINAL NEIL

Action from Saturday’s clash between Maitland Pickers and Cessnock Goannas. Photos: MARINAL NEIL

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Happy New Year

Thousands of people attended theAssyrian New Year Festival at Fairfield Showground on Sunday.Hermiz Shahen from theAssyrianUniversal Alliance said it was an “unbelievable’’ celebration enjoyed by all.
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Big turnout: Official numbers are not through but it is believed nearly 10,000 people attended the Assyrian New Year Festival.

Entertainment: The festival featured a range of entertainment including live musical performances by an assortment of Assyrian singers.

Theatre: A dramatic art piece based on Assyrian historical records of the New Year’s Festival in ancient times was performed by a collaboration of Assyrian youth groups.

Guests: The event was attended by local, state and federal politicians, as well as special guests from overseas and community organisations.

Party: The event was full of great food, variety stall and rides for the children. It finished with a fireworks display.

Past: For the fifth successive year, an exhibition was organised by The Young Assyrians of The Assyrian.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.