Monthly Archives: September 2019

home of week 2

“It’s convenient living,” she says.
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The harbour views are also present in the master bedroom, which has an ensuite.

Allen’s grandmother’s rocking chair sits beside the window.

Timber shelving that belonged to Allen’s mother is featured, as is a timber dresser that sits in front of a gold-framed wall-hung mirror.

“My granddaughter comes in here and says she feels like a princess,” Lorraine says.

Bedside tables (dubbed by the designer as “the antiques of the future”) were custom made in Sydney to match the family heirloom furnishings.

Lorraine reveals her personal tastes in a wall hanging and other artwork.

“I wanted this room to be a bit French, because I love France,” she says.

A second bedroom serves as guest quarters, and adjoins one of the apartment’s two other bathrooms.

Two remaining bedrooms are used as Lorraine and Allen’s studies wheretheir personal passions are displayed.

Lorraine’s love of English history shows in the titles lining her bookshelves.She is especially fond of a set of two “cupid” pictures on her wall that once hung over her mother’s parents’ bed and bear watermarks from the 1955 flood.

Allen’s domain is known as “the library”.

“I’m just a bibliophile,” he says.Australian history and the Vietnam War are favoured subjects for the book lover and war veteran.

This room also accommodates a special piece: the last mayor’s chair (which Allen had reupholstered) from the chambers of the former Merewether Council.

There are more beautifully-bound books on a custom-made bookcase (complete with handles salvaged from old printing industry typesetting drawers) in the hallway, and a special edition of Antarctic and Arctic photographs on a hall table.

An antique book press is another of Allen’s treasures.

He spent 40 years in the printing industry.

Wonderful pieces of art and memorabilia are placed throughout the house: from the antique diving gear in the main bathroom (“God your spa must be deep” a friend joked to the Fairhalls); to the Pro Hart sculptures in the living areas; a ballerinapainting above the lounge which reflects Lorraine’s joy at getting through a second cancer diagnosis; and a collection of historic black and white photographs of Allen’s father, a former federal minister and MP, the late Sir Allen Fairhall, alongside many luminaries.

It’s an apartment that looks out on so much and holds even more within.

Sweet harbour life

Sweet harbour life TweetFacebook Fairhall home, Breakwater ApartmentsIt was while cruising Newcastle Harbour that a desire to live by its side struck Lorraine and Allen Fairhall.
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Now they couldn’t imagine living anywhere else.

While on a boat celebrating a family birthday, the pair snapped a picture of a friend’s waterview home.

Lorraine recalls remarking later to Allen: “I’d love to live there.”

About a month later, driving down Wharf Road, they spotted a “for sale” sign out the front of the Breakwater Apartments.

The Fairhalls bought the new unit and, 13 years on, say it’s everything they were looking for.

“Now we wouldn’t live anywhere else,” Lorraine says.

The Newcastle Foreshore apartment’s views – to Nobbys headland and across the harbour – strike on entry to the open-plan lounge and dining area.

Floor-to-ceiling windows and glass bifold doors out to the balcony, ensure the stunning panorama is always in sight.

The Fairhalls love the outlook and the interaction with passers-by.

“There’s always something to see,” Lorraine says.

“People going past … ships.

“When the cruise ships … go past I’d make a cup of coffee and see people on the cruise ship and we’d wave to each other.

“We have a lovely view but I think it’s the intimacy of people walking past and you wave ‘how are you’.

“It’s just nice, friendly people.

“I think that’s as good as a view, if not better.”

That friendly banter extends to the kitchen, which features cream-coloured cabinetry, mirrored splashbacks, and a space to eat in by large view-enhancing windows.

A white ceramic pig has pride of place on the sill.

“We get a lot of people point up and laugh at our pig,” Lorraine says, with good humour.

Lorraine enjoys cooking, but finds herself doing less and less of it.

“Now I like going to restaurants,” she says.

“We can walk up the top of town to Pacific Street, obviously down the boardwalk here.

“It’s convenient living,” she says.

The harbour views are also present in the master bedroom, which has an ensuite.

Allen’s grandmother’s rocking chair sits beside the window.

Timber shelving that belonged to Allen’s mother is featured, as is a timber dresser that sits in front of a gold-framed wall-hung mirror.

“My granddaughter comes in here and says she feels like a princess,” Lorraine says.

Bedside tables (dubbed by the designer as “the antiques of the future”) were custom made in Sydney to match the family heirloom furnishings.

Lorraine reveals her personal tastes in a wall hanging and other artwork.

“I wanted this room to be a bit French, because I love France,” she says.

A second bedroom serves as guest quarters, and adjoins one of the apartment’s two other bathrooms.

Two remaining bedrooms are used as Lorraine and Allen’s studies.

Here their personal passions are displayed.

Lorraine’s love of English history shows in the titles lining her bookshelves.

She is especially fond of a set of two “cupid” pictures on her wall that once hung over her mother’s parents’ bed and bear watermarks from the 1955 flood.

Allen’s domain is known as “the library”.

“I’m just a bibliophile,” he says.

Australian history and the Vietnam War are favoured subjects for the book lover and war veteran.

This room also accommodates a special piece: the last mayor’s chair (which Allen had recovered) from the chambers of the former Merewether Council.

There are more beautifully-bound books on a custom-made bookcase (complete with handles salvaged from old printing industry typesetting drawers) in the hallway, and a special edition of Antarctic and Arctic photographs on a hall table.

An antique book press is another of Allen’s treasures.

He spent 40 years in the printing industry.

Wonderful pieces of art and memorabilia are placed throughout the house: from the antique diving gear in the main bathroom (“God your spa must be deep” a friend joked to the Fairhalls); to the Pro Hart sculptures in the living areas; aBallerinapainting above the lounge which reflects Lorraine’s joy at getting through a second cancer diagnosis; and a collection of historic black and white photographs of Allen’s father, a former federal minister and MP, the late Sir Allen Fairhall, alongside luminaries such as the Queen Mother, Sir Robert Menzies, Prince Charles and Lyndon Johnson, and being knighted by the Queen.

It’s an apartment that looks out on so much and holds even more within.

– ENDS –

ASX dives to one-month low as sell-off continues

Investors on Tuesday shrugged off the decision by the RBA to hold rates steady. Photo: Sasha WoolleyShares dived to a one-month low on Tuesday, weighed down by the big banks and falls in energy and mining stocks after further drops in commodity prices, while investors shrugged off the decision by the Reserve Bank of Australia to hold rates steady.
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Negative leads from US markets and weaker oil prices led the market lower from the opening bell and the bourse headed lower from there, with the benchmark S&P/ASX200 closing 1.4 per cent lower at 4924.4 and the broader All Ordinaries down 1.4 per cent to 5000.4.

“The opening fall was no surprise given the US lead and the fact that oil prices are coming back a little bit,” said senior private client advisor Alistair McCorquodale.

“I think there’s some things like Arrium filtering through and obviously our domestic banks have got some exposure to that, so I think there’s a little bit of nervousness around bad debts.

“Commodities continue to slide so you see a bit of weakness in the miners. The strength has been in the offshore defensives – stocks like Ansell and Amcor that have good defensive offshore exposure.”

Chris Conway, Head of Research at Australian Stock Report, said equity markets remained tightly linked to oil markets.

“The weakness is hardly surprising given how commodities fared overnight,” he said. “As oil goes, so too will equities.

“It follows that if you can form a strong opinion about the outlook for oil, you should, by default, have an equally strong opinion about the fortunes for equity markets.”

Mr Conway said “compelling, sustainable” growth stocks such as Premier Investments, APN Outdoor and Qantas could withstand the oil-equity correlation.

On Asian markets, Japan’s Nikkei plunged to a six-week low, after the stronger yen hurt the overall market mood. Analysts said worries that the strong yen might erode exporters’ profits would probably continue to weigh on the market.

Among blue-chip mining stocks, BHP Billiton was down 3.3 per cent to $15.98 and Rio Tinto dipped 2 per cent to $41.96. Oil and gas producer Woodside dropped 4.2 per cent.

In banking news, The Australian Financial Review reported that Westpac would be the latest major lender to be targeted by the corporate regulator.

The paper revealed that ASIC was readying action against a second major bank in relation to alleged market misconduct, chats and potential rigging of the bank bill swap rate.  ANZ Banking Group is already the subject of court action spearheaded by the regulator.

Investors continued to dump the major lenders. Westpac dropped 1.9 per cent to $29.13. ANZ fell 1.5 per cent to $22.47, National Australia Bank shed 1 per cent to $25.56 and Commonwealth Bank dived 2.3 per cent to $71.25.

Shares in Nine Entertainment tumbled as much as 29 per cent to a record low following the TV broadcaster’s revenue update.

A rain-plagued summer of cricket and a poor start to the ratings year, including the disastrous launch of Reno Rumble, all weighed on Nine’s revenue to start 2016.

Nine’s television revenues were down 11 per cent in the third quarter of the financial year, compared with the corresponding period, which the company said was also affected by an earlier Easter and no Cricket World Cup.

Shares ended Tuesday 23.7 per cent lower at $1.17.

Downer EDI came under more pressure to win new rail contracts after losing a key mining services contracts with Fortescue.​

Downer’s shares plummeted 9.6 per cent to $3.38 after the contractor revealed late on Monday that Fortescue would perform its own mining services work at its Christmas Creek iron ore mine in Western Australia from October.

The mining services contract is estimated to contribute around $400 million of annually to Downer’s group revenues, and account for about 20 per cent of its mining work-in-hand, according to Citi.

Virgin Australia shares were flat at 36 cents after news its credit rating has been placed on review for a possible downgrade by Moody’s, amid ongoing uncertainty over the airline’s capital structure, the level of shareholder support and its slower than expected reduction of debt.

Last week, Air New Zealand said it could sell all or part of its 26 per cent stake in the Australian carrier.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Pure dog breeds are getting smaller, study finds

“Cute but not necessarily functional.”That adorable snuffling sound your cute little dog makes could be a sign of future respiratory problems, yet Australians are increasingly buying smaller dogs, according to a new University of Sydney study.
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Researcher Paul McGreevy from the university’s faculty of veterinary science found that lovers of pure dog breeds are choosing pugs and poodles over Labradors and German shepherds.

This, he said, will likely lead to an increase in health problems for our four-legged friends.

The preference for smaller dogs correlates with a trend towards higher density living, Professor McGreevy said.

Australians are forgoing the large suburban dog and are now favouring small “brachycephalic” breeds: dogs with shorter and wider heads.

“Forty years ago you could see lots of Afghan hounds, Irish setters and old English sheepdogs in Australian suburbs. They’ve been replaced with shorter, smaller dogs.”

Professor McGreevy said these breeds are more susceptible to respiratory problems, skin and eye conditions, and digestive disorders.

Why are people choosing dogs with short, wide faces, such as the pug?

“Studies indicate that infantile facial features commonly seen in brachycephalic dogs – round faces, chubby cheeks, big eyes and small nose and mouth – stimulate feelings of affection in humans,” Professor McGreevy said.

“Cute, but not necessarily functional,” is how he describes some of these breeds. He points out that some pugs and similar brachycephalic dogs can struggle to sleep lying down and will try to sleep while sitting up.

He points out that these dogs cost more to insure and there is a reason.

While these breeds have shorter skulls, Professor McGreevy said, they also have the same tissues that a longer shaped skull would have.

“The teeth and soft tissues are crammed into a smaller space. So we see dental crowding. This can make the dogs more reluctant to chew, which can predispose them to dental problems. We see a soft palate flapping in the airway that gives them the characteristic respiratory noise. We also see excess folding of tissues on the outside of the dog’s head, around the nose and the eyes.

“These skin folds can be problematic with eczema and sometimes rolls of skin can sit on the cornea, causing ophthalmic problems.”

He said there is troubling evidence these breeds of dogs have life spans that are up to 30 per cent shorter.

The research is based on data kept by the Australian National Kennel Council. It found that from 1986 to 2013 registration of medium and small breeds increased by 5.3 per cent and 4.2 per cent respectively, relative to large breeds. Against giant breeds (Great Danes, rottweilers), registration of small dogs increased 11 per cent.

“The demand for all pedigree dogs is declining, but the decline in shorter dogs, lighter dogs, is occurring at a significantly less rapid rate,” Professor McGreevy said.

The data from the ANKC covers registered pure breed dogs. These accounted for 16.5 per cent of newborn puppies in 2014. So while this does not cover all dogs born in Australia recently, Dr McGreevy said “we can only speculate that these are reflective of the more general demand and they mirror trends that have been reported overseas”.

The findings were published this week in Canine Genetics and Epidemiology.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Line should be extended: Constance

Andrew Constance.
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ANDREW Constance says Newcastle’s light rail line should be extended in the future, he just doesn’t know if he’ll be the man to do it.

The Transport Minister became the first in the governmentto back the idea of an extended light rail system in Newcastle duringhis visit to the city on Tuesday, saying extending the line into a wider network was “the whole point” of introducing the system into the city.

“This is in essence building a line that is going to form the basis of a network in generations to come,” Mr Constancesaid.

“We’re going to crack on and build what will be a line that will provide a spine for the tram network in the city and I would expect future governments to extend light rail throughout the city.

“That’s why we’re in the midst now of starting a review in terms of that future extension.”

He said that, while there were “no costs” for an extension,the release of the project’s review of environmental factors on Thursday would reveal that the government is looking at future route options.

“Into the future there will be politicians like me announcing new lines and new network but it has got to be looked at holistically,” he said.

“There’s a lot of community assets around the city where you would ideally have light rail, be it the hospital, the stadium, be it the university.”

Butthe minister stopped short of saying when, or if, his government would do it.

“I’m charged with building it at the moment,let’s get the first rail down,” he said.

“One thing I do know is people tend to believe it when they see it [and]I would expect this healthy skepticism to remain until wethat first line down.”

While Labor itself has not committed to extending the network, ithas called for the government to commit to extending the line and fund it using money from the Port of Newcastle sale.

Newcastle MP Tim Crakanthorp said the government shoulduse some of that money to “create a network that goes to the employment, education and retail nodes in the city”.

Asked on Tuesday whether the government should use more money from the Port of Newcastle sale to fund infrastructure like the extension, Mr Constance said the city was “very lucky”.

“The people of NSW own the port [and] the people of NSW are going to benefit from it,” he said.“I come from a regional community,we’re entitled to our fair share of the state’s assets too.”